Mass voters reject challenge to 40B affordable housing law (Statehouse News Service, November 3)
Voters Protect Affordable Housing Law, Defeat Question 2 by Wide Margin

Massachusetts voted to protect the affordable housing law yesterday, with 58 percent of the electorate voting “no” on Question 2, reports Statehouse News Service. "With the decisive defeat of Question 2 voters today preserved the state's affordable housing law, ensuring that hard-working families and seniors have a place to call home and protecting thousands of jobs," No on 2 spokeswoman Francy Ronayne said in a statement. "The largest grassroots state-wide coalition of its kind –academic, business, civic, civil rights, environmental, housing, labor, religious, and senior groups - came together to protect the affordable housing law. This victory is a testament to their determination and commitment to that fact that everyone should have access to affordable housing in Massachusetts. We are grateful for their support and proud of our fellow citizens for taking a stand in support of affordable housing."
Boston Phoenix Endorsements (Boston Phoenix, November 1)
News Weekly Asks Voters to Vote “NO” on Question 2

The affordable housing law is “important” and should not be repealed, writes the Boston Phoenix in an editorial opposing Question 2. The Phoenix writes repealing the law would leave the state without the guidelines for building affordable housing that have served it well. “We recommend NO ON 2,” it said.
Editorial: Choices for Election Day (Harvard Post, October 31)
Harvard Post Urges Voters to Vote No on Question 2

The Harvard Post recommended its readers vote “no” on Question 2 in a campaign-focused editorial. The creation of affordable housing is one of the state’s most urgent challenge, The Post writes. The affordable housing law is the primary means to do just that. “Repealing it would amount to walking away from one of Massachusetts' most pressing problems,” it said. “Vote NO.”
Voters Weigh Fate of Mass. Affordable Housing Law (Associated Press, October 28)
Law Credited With Building Tens of Thousands of New Homes

The affordable housing law made it possible for Tyan Bassett and her family to stay on Cape Cod, where she was raised, reports the Associated Press. Bassett and her husband live with their two children in a home built by Habitat for Humanity, close to where they grew up and where their families still live. "It's one of the four miracles in my life: my husband, my kids and my house," said Bassett, whose husband is a licensed electrician and a plumber's apprentice. "You cry happy tears when you know that the alternative is horrible. This is heaven.”
No on Question 2 (Berkshire Eagle, October 31)
Berkshire Eagle Encourages Readers to Vote “No” on Question 2

The lack of affordable housing in the Berkshires hinders economic development because employers don’t want to open businesses if there is nowhere for their employees to live, writes the Berkshire Eagle in an editorial opposing Question 2. The affordable housing law helps build housing for working families and seniors, the paper writes. “If first-time home buyers want to stay in Berkshire communities they grow up in, if senior citizens want to stay in the Berkshire communities they have always lived in, many will need the help Chapter 40B was designed to provide and has provided Massachusetts for decades,” it said.
Save affordable housing: Vote NO on Question 2 (North Adams Transcript, October 31)
Berkshires Need Affordable Housing Law for Working Families

The affordable housing law is needed in Berkshire County and in small towns across the Commonwealth, writes Brad Gordon in an op/ed in the North Adams Transcript. Gordon says housing is difficult to build in the Berkshires, where some towns require an acre or more per home, making it too expensive for working families and seniors. “A ‘No’ vote keeps the affordable housing law in place and allows our rural and suburban towns to work together with our cities to create a county-wide approach to affordable housing in the Berkshires for our seniors and working families,” he writes. “Vote ‘No’ on 2.”
EDITORIAL: Vote 'no' on 2 - We need the housing (Weston Town Crier, October 21)
Weston Town Crier Asks Readers to Vote “No” on Question 2

The Commonwealth needs the affordable housing law to help working families stay in Massachusetts, writes the Weston Town Crier in an editorial urging readers to vote “no” on Question 2. The high cost of housing in Massachusetts drives young families out of state and discourages new businesses from locating here, it said. “It is bad for the economy and for the quality of life.”
Endorsement: Reject fraudulent 40B repeal, vote no on Question 2 (Belmont Citizen-Herald, October 30)
Belmont Citizen-Herald Editorializes Against Question 2

The move to repeal the affordable housing law is a mistake and should be rejected, writes the Belmont Citizen-Herald in an editorial asking readers to vote “no” on Question 2. The paper writes that that the law has been successful, and is responsible for the construction of nearly 60,000 housing units, many set aside for residents who might not otherwise be able to afford to live in Massachusetts. “Vote no on Question 2,” it says.
Vote “No” on Question 2 (Lowell Sun, October 29)
Keep the affordable Housing Law to Keep 12,000 Needed Homes

If the affordable housing law is repealed, nearly 11,000 jobs, $2 billion in economic activity and several thousand affordable homes in the pipeline will be lost, writes Lisa Alberghini in a letter to the Lowell Sun. There is wide support for keeping the affordable housing law intact, with a broad group of business people, seniors organizations, League of Women's Voters, interfaith groups and others saying vote "No" on Question 2, she writes.
Editorial: Ballot questions rate a big 'no' (Amherst Bulletin, October 29)
Amherst Bulletin Encourages Readers to Vote “NO” on 2

The affordable housing law is the state’s primary tool for creating affordable housing, writes the Amherst Bulletin in an editorial opposing Question 2. Since its enactment, the law is responsible for creating more than 1,000 developments statewide, with almost 58,000 homes -- including more than 29,000 for low- and moderate-income households, the paper wrote. Repealing the law “would mean that less -- and in some cases no -- affordable housing would be built, leaving working families and seniors with even fewer options.”
QUESTION 2: No on repealing Chapter 40B (Barnstable Patriot, October 29)
Barnstable Patriot Opposes Question 2, Says to Vote No

The affordable housing law lets developers and towns work together to create more affordable housing, writes the Barnstable Patriot in an editorial opposing Question 2. The law has helped increase the affordable housing stock in Barnstable and should not be repealed, the paper writes. “To think that elimination of the state’s prime spur to development of affordable housing would create a sudden boom in affordable-only construction is ludicrous,” it said.
Recommended to Island voters (Martha’s Vineyard Times, October 28)
Martha’s Vineyard Times Urges Readers to Vote “NO” on Question 2

The affordable housing law is “a proven valuable tool” in the Vineyard, said an editorial opposing Question 2. The affordable housing law is not the dangerous and overpowering weapon for developers that critics charge, writes the paper. “The Vineyard needs 40B, and a No vote will leave it in place,” it said.
Endorsement: No on Question 2 (Brookline TAB, October 28)
Brookline TAB Encourages Readers to Vote "NO" on Question 2

It is reckless to repeal the affordable housing law without an alternative, writes the Brookline TAB in an editorial urging readers to vote “no” on Question 2. The high cost of housing, especially in the eastern half of the Bay State, drives young families out of state and discourages new businesses from locating here, it said. “It is bad for the economy and for the quality of life.”
Advocate Aaron Gornstein discusses anti-40B ballot question (Patriot Ledger, October 27)
Affordable Housing Law Crucial to Building Affordable Housing in Massachusetts

There is nothing to replace the affordable housing law if it is passed on Tuesday, said Citizen Housing and Planning Association executive director Aaron Gornstein in a Q&A with the Patriot Ledger. Gornstein said the affordable housing law is responsible for building 80 percent of the affordable housing in the last decade. “It allows municipalities to serve local housing needs for people with a range of incomes, including health care workers, teachers, seniors, municipal employees and younger families,” he said.
In Our Opinion: State ballot questions are unwise (Daily Hampshire Gazette, October 27)
Daily Hampshire Gazette Editorializes Against Ballot Questions

The affordable housing law is the primary tool in creating affordable housing, writes the Daily Hampshire Gazette in an editorial urging readers to vote “no” on Question 2. Since its enactment, the law is responsible for creating more than 29,000 affordable housing units for low- and moderate-income households, the paper writes. Repealing the law “would mean that less - and in some cases no - affordable housing would be built, leaving working families and seniors with even fewer options,” it said.
Editorial: Vote no Massachusetts ballot questions 1, 2 and 3 (Springfield Republican, October 27)
Springfield Republican Voices Opposition to Question 2

Voting “no” on Question 2 is the “right thing to do,” writes the Springfield Republican in an editorial opposing the ballot initiative. Though Springfield has made affordable housing a priority, restrictive rules in some suburban communities have prevented the development of some worthy projects, the paper writes. “We believe affordable housing is the responsibility of the entire region,” it said.
ENDORSEMENT: Defeat ballot questions (New Bedford Standard Times, October 26)
New Bedford Standard Times Urges Readers to Vote “No” on Question 2

The affordable housing law creates “badly” needed affordable housing in a high-cost state, writes the New Bedford Standard Times in an editorial opposing the ballot question. The law allows more older residents and young people just starting out to remain in the towns where they want to live, writes the paper. “Excessive housing costs hurt the entire economy, and 40B has been a useful tool to address the problem,” it said.
Our View: Questions — Yes on 1; no on 2 and 3 (Salem News, October 26)
Salem News Editorializes Against Question 2

The affordable housing law is a “useful” tool for ensuring there is affordable housing in all communities, writes the Salem News in an editorial opposing Question 2. The newspaper writes that though communities in its readership have placed a high premium on affordable housing, not all have done so. “There are some who view zoning as a means of keeping people out rather than a tool to encourage reasonable development,” it wrote.
Abington apartment complex illustrates need for Chapter 40B affordable housing in region (Patriot Ledger, October 26)
Affordable Housing Development Boosted Tax Base

The Woodlands affordable housing development in Abington has only had positive affects on the town, reports the Patriot Ledger. Town officials tell the paper that the development has not burdened the school system or police and fire departments, and the development pays $284,000 a year in property taxes. The apartment complex also helped push up the town’s affordable housing stock;the state goal for every community is 10 percent affordable housing, and Abington’s level was 8.8 percent as of September.
Amherst board urges ‘no’ vote on Question 2 (Daily Hampshire Gazette, October 26)
Select Board Calls Affordable Housing Law Consistent with Community's Values

The Amherst Select Board Monday voted unanimously to encourage voters to vote “no” on Question 2 to protect the affordable housing law, reports the Daily Hampshire Gazette. Select Board Chairwoman Stephanie O'Keeffe said promoting affordable housing is supported by the town's master plan, according to the article. "This simply makes no sense to repeal this legislative statute,” said Peter Jessop, chairman of the Amherst Housing Authority.

Dowload a copy of the article here

Progressive Democrats of Somerville oppose all three state ballot questions (Somerville Journal, October 26)
Political Group Throws Support Behind Affordable Housing Law

The Progressive Democrats of Somerville have voted to join Mayor Joe Curtatone and the Somerville delegation to the Mass. Legislature in opposition of all three ballot questions, reports the Somerville Journal. The laws provisions ensuring streamlined permitting for affordable housing developments have made a huge difference, helping to create more affordable housing, the paper reports. ‘We can’t afford to throw it away,” it writes.
In The Ballot Box (Worcester Business Journal, October 25)
WBJ Reverses Stance, Urges Readers to Vote “No” on Question 2

“On the repeal of the state’s Chapter 40B affordable housing regulations, we find ourselves reversing our previously held position,” writes the Worcester Business Journal in an editorial urging readers to vote “no” on Question 2. The paper writes that the affordable housing law provides the state with the kind of housing it needs for economic recovery. The affordable housing law fosters the development of affordable housing for working families, who are crucial to rebuilding the state’s economy, the paper writes.
Rust: In affordable housing debate, THEY are US (Sudbury Town Crier, October 21)
People From Across All Spectrums Benefit From Affordable Housing Law

Many different kinds of families live in affordable housing developments, writes Beth Rust in an impassioned latter to the Sudbury Town Crier. People from many walks of life, some facing difficult and unexpected circumstances, move into the homes the affordable housing law creates, she writes, including X-ray technicians, paralegals, teachers, hair stylists, nurses, religious educators, and restaurant workers. “I think our community is enriched by having the people who work here, be able to live here,” she writes. “For me, the social value is worth more than the increased physical density it brings.”
Tax-cut proposals, 40B repeal, would hobble Bay State (Attleboro Sun Chronicle, October 25)
Sun Chronicle Opposes Question 2, Urges Readers to Vote “No”

The affordable housing law has resulted in the creation of affordable housing, editorializes the Sun Chronicle, something the state desperately needs. The paper urges voters to vote “no” on Question 2, writing that it is unrealistic to expect the legislature to write a new law if the affordable housing law is repealed. “But proponents of this question ask voters to buy the assumption that repeal of the law will lead to adoption of a new and better one,” the paper writes. “The Legislature's inability to reform the old law points to deep divisions that weigh against that happening.”
Question 2 would hurt seniors (Brookline Tab, October 25)
Housing single largest expense for older households

Housing will become less affordable for seniors if Question 2 is passed, writes campaign treasurer Ellen Feingold in a letter to the Brookline Tab. Feingold writes that the demand for affordable housing options for seniors will double in the next decade, and communities will struggle to meet that demand if the affordable housing law is repealed. “Seniors face tremendous burdens to keep a roof over their heads, and there will be many more Massachusetts residents facing this situation in years to come,” she writes.
Family finds Middleboro home a perfect fit thanks to law (Brockton Enterprise, October 24)
Housing Law Helps Working Families Buy Homes

The affordable housing law helped working parents Leo and Marguerite Sousa buy a house in Middleboro that met their needs, reports the Brockton Enterprise. The Sousa's daughter was born with spina bifida and uses a wheelchair. They were selected from a lottery seven years ago for affordable housing unit with handicap accessibility, which they otherwise might not have been able to afford. "For us, it's been a great thing and we appreciate it," said Leo Sousa.
Norwell development gave single mom a chance to stay in hometown (Patriot Ledger, October 23)
Affordable housing would become hard to build if law is repealed

Christa Larson was undergoing treatment for cancer in 2002 when a chance to buy a home at the new Silver Brook Farm development in Norwell offered a beacon of hope, reports the Patriot Ledger. Because apartment rents were out of her price range, Larson, a single mother and nurse at a retirement community, moved into her parent’s home with her two sons. The affordable housing law helped her move close to her work and ensured her sons could attend Norwell High School. “It was a miracle for me,” she said.
ENDORSEMENT: Ballot questions 2, 3 would hurt state more than help (Patriot Ledger, October 22)
Patriot Ledger Encourages Readers to Vote “No” on Question 2

The affordable housing law has helped families buy homes in towns they otherwise would not be able to afford, writes the Patriot Ledger in an editorial in opposition to Question 2. The Ledger writes that the law would be a “crippling blow” to efforts to make Massachusetts more affordable. “Killing the state’s affordable housing initiative is wrong,” it writes.
Massachusetts needs housing — so vote no on Question 2 (Boston Globe, October 22)
Boston Globe Editorializes in Opposition of Question 2

Question 2 deserves a "resounding no", writes the Boston Globe in a passionate editorial in opposition of Question 2. The Globe calls the ballot question "misguided" and writes that the law simply tries to assure that the state has some affordable housing to help keep people in Massachusetts and close to where they work. "A reasonable supply of moderately-priced housing in Massachusetts is key to retaining and attracting businesses," writes The Globe. "A strong 'no' vote on Question 2 is needed to keep the state's housing starts alive."
Paying the Price of Popularity, Boston Globe, October 22)
Housing costs on the rise in Somerville

Housing cost is rising in Somerville, pricing-out even the middle class, reports the Boston Globe. Despite the housing market crash, rents have actually gone up in 2010, and an estimated 68 percent of Somerville's housing units are rentals, according to The Globe. "It is a major community issue," said city spokesman Michael Meehan.
EDITORIAL: Vote 'no' on 2 - We need the housing (MetroWest Daily News, October 21)
MetroWest Daily News Opposes Question 2

Massachusetts needs the affordable housing law to lower the cost of living, writes the MetroWest Daily News in an editorial opposing Question 2. The ballot question seeking to repeal the affordable housing law leaves the state with no alternatives for creating the affordable housing that Massachusetts residents “desperately” need. “The high cost of housing, especially in the eastern half of the Bay State, drives young families out of state and discourages new businesses from locating here,” the paper writes. “It is bad for the economy and for the quality of life.”
Reasons Residents of Chelsea and Revere Should Vote No on 2 (Chelsea Record, October 21)
Chelsea and Revere can make a difference in affordable housing

Revere Mayor Thomas Ambrosino and Chelsea City Manager Jay Ash ask voters to join them in voting “no” on Question 2 in an op/ed in the Chelsea Record. Though Chelsea and Revere have made great strides in affordable housing, not all regions of the state have been as successful, and depend on the affordable housing law to create more affordable housing. “Although we’re making progress, times are tough for too many working families and seniors,” they write.

Download a PDF of the Op/Ed Here

Ballot Initiatives (WCVB-TV, October 21, 2010)
Channel 5 Opposes Question 2

The immediate loss of the affordable housing law would leave Massachusetts with no means of supplying affordable homes, writes Bill Fine, WCVB-TV President and General Manager. Fine urges viewers to vote “no” on Question 2 to protect affordable housing in Massachusetts. “The immediate loss of Chapter 40B would dramatically hurt the cause for affordable housing,” he writes
LETTER: Vote no on Question 2 (Newton Tab, October 20, 2010)
The affordable housing law is a tool for economic growth in Massachusetts

The Commonwealth needs a diverse housing market so the state’s economy can “grow and be vibrant,” said Judy Jacobson of Newton in letter to the Newton Tab. Without the affordable housing law, almost no new affordable housing would be built in most communities across the commonwealth,” Jacobson writes, urging voters to vote “no” on Question 2. “The Affordable Housing Law is one of the few tools we have to create housing that is affordable to modest income families and seniors in most areas of the Commonwealth,” she said.
Editorial: Nov. 2 ballot questions- No, no and no (Harwich Oracle, October 20)
Harwich Oracle Urges Readers to Vote “No” on Question 2

Many Cape Codders cannot afford the housing prices on Cape Cod, and the problem will only worsen if the affordable housing law is repealed, writes the Harwich Oracle in an editorial encouraging readers to vote “no” on Question 2. Non-profits like Habitat for Humanity depend on the affordable housing law to help them carry out their mission of making Massachusetts a less expensive place to live. “If voters approve this question, affordable housing advocates across the commonwealth will have little to do besides roll up the carpets, turn out the lights, pack their bags and head to the nearest border, where they can enter another state that still cares about putting a roof over the heads of low-income families and individuals,” writes the Oracle.
COLUMN: Support affordable housing, vote no on 2 (Marblehead Reporter, October 20)
State can’t afford to lose primary tool for creating reasonably-priced housing

The affordable housing law is the main tool for creating affordable housing for seniors and working families, wrote Kurt James in a letter to the Marblehead reporter. The law continues to create homes for residents throughout Massachusetts, and if it is repealed, 12,000 units that are already in the pipeline will not be built, costing the state thousands of jobs. “Regardless of how you vote on Election Day, make sure you have the facts about housing and jobs before you cast your ballot,” James writes.
Lexington Housing Partnership: Vote No on Question 2 (Lexington Minuteman, October 20)
The affordable housing law benefits many throughout Massachusetts

Support for the affordable housing law crosses political lines, writes the Lexington Housing Partnership in a letter to the editor in the Lexington Minuteman. All four candidates for governor support the affordable housing law and have urged their supporters to vote “no” on Question 2. “They all acknowledge that there will continue to be a need for more affordable housing in the Commonwealth,” the housing partnership writes.
Support affordable housing, vote ‘no’ on 2 (Greenfield Recorder, October 20)
Law Essential To Building Affordable Housing

If voters vote “yes” on Question 2, a lot less affordable housing will be built in a lot fewer places, write Robin Sherman and Paul Douglas in an op/ed in the Greenfield Recorder. Repealing the affordable housing law will make it virtually impossible to build new housing in small towns, they write. “And that will mean fewer housing options for our elders and working families — our parents and grandparents living on fixed incomes, and our children who are struggling to make it on their own, working in jobs with entry-level wages,” they said.

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“No on Question 2″ by John Edward (richardhowe.com, October 20)
Repeal Will Hurt Massachusetts Housing Market

Housing is already too expensive and will only get more so if the affordable housing law is repealed, writes economic professor John Edward on the blog richardhowe.com. Edward writes that it could take legislators years to develop a viable alternative to the law, worsening the housing crisis. “The affordable housing obstructionists may wish they had left well enough alone,” he writes.
40B has worked well for state (Worcester Telegram & Gazette, October 20)
Massachusetts Residents Must Stand Together Against Repeal Efforts

In an editorial in the Worcester Telegram & Gazette, Reverend Robert S. Bachelder writes that the affordable housing law is “critically important” for creating affordable housing in Massachusetts. He writes that those who benefit from the law are nurses, teachers, retail employees, social workers, single parents, veterans, people with disabilities, retirees, and many others. “These are people who work hard, pay taxes and contribute to the vitality of communities across the state,” he said. “They would not have been able to afford a home without this law.”
Suhrbier and Rodgers: Vote no on Question 2: Protect the Housing Act (Winchester Star, October 19)
Affordable Housing Law Has Proved Beneficial to Massachusetts

Over the last 40 years, the affordable housing law has proved to be effective and economically beneficial, write John Suhrbier and Allan Rodgers in an op/ed in the Winchester Star. Analyses conducted by the University of Massachusetts found that the existing housing law has resulted in 50,000 jobs and $9.25 billion of construction and related spending over the past 10 years, they write. The affordable housing law “continues to be the single most important program to encourage the development of housing, and especially affordable housing,” they write.
Question 2 threatens good law (Berkshire Eagle, October 19)
Affordable Housing Law Fosters Development in Small Towns

The law is needed in Berkshire County and in small towns across the Commonwealth, writes Brad Gordon in an op/ed in the Berkshire Eagle. The affordable housing law helps small towns create affordable housing developments, which are crucial to keeping working families and seniors in their communities, writes Gordon. “We will also need affordable housing to keep young working families in the Berkshires to build and strengthen our economy, especially in future years,” said Gordon.
Letter: 40B allows towns to ‘shape’ projects (Brookline Tab, October 18)
Housing Law Helps Towns Meet Local Need

In a letter to the Brookline Tab, David Pollock urges voters to vote “no” on Question 2. Chapter 40B enables Brookline and other towns to actively encourage and shape development projects to meet local needs, he writes. “Opportunities to develop well-designed, affordable housing are not easy to come by, particularly in built-out towns like ours,” he writes.
Bourne Carrier (EDITORIAL: Ballot questions: No, no, and no, October 17)
Bourne Carrier Urges Readers to Vote “No” on Question 2

An editorial in the Bourne Carrier urged readers to vote “no” on all three ballot questions, including Question 2. The affordable housing law is the single most important tool for creating affordable housing, said the editorial. “If voters approve this question, affordable housing advocates across the commonwealth will have little to do besides roll up the carpets, turn out the lights, pack their bags and head to the nearest border, where they can enter another state that still cares about putting a roof over the heads of low-income families and individuals,” it said.
Question 2 (Cape Cod Times, October 16)
Cape Cod Times Urges Voters to Vote “No” on Question 2

In a strong editorial in support of the affordable housing law, the Cape Cod Times urged people to vote “no” on Question 2. The paper called the affordable housing law an “effective” tool for building much-needed affordable housing in Massachusetts and on Cape Cod. The affordable housing law “is working,” the paper wrote. “Now is not the time to repeal it.”
40B gets the job done, affordable housing proponents say (Metrowest Daily News, October 15)
Housing Panel Voices Support for Affordable Housing Law

A coalition of more than 1,300 individuals and organizations support the affordable housing law because they know understand the law’s economic and social value for communities in Massachusetts, write Claire Higgins and Joanne Campbell in an op/ed in the Daily Hampshire Gazette. The laws supporters include a “broad-based” coalition of civic, municipal, business, labor, housing, environmental and religious leaders, including the League of Women Voters and AARP. “In western Massachusetts, the affordable housing law has worked well for seniors and working families," they write.
Claire Higgins and Joanne Campbell: Don't reject affordable housing (Daily Hampshire Gazette, October 15)
Affordable Housing Law Draws Wide Range of Support

A coalition of more than 1,300 individuals and organizations support the affordable housing law because they know understand the law’s economic and social value for communities in Massachusetts, write Claire Higgins and Joanne Campbell in an op/ed in the Daily Hampshire Gazette. The laws supporters include a “broad-based” coalition of civic, municipal, business, labor, housing, environmental and religious leaders, including the League of Women Voters and AARP. “In western Massachusetts, the affordable housing law has worked well for seniors and working families," they write.
Vote No on 2 to protect affordable homes (Cape Cod Times, October 14)
Affordable Housing Law Plays Crucial Role in State Economy

Now is not the time to repeal the affordable housing law, Tripp Jones and Victoria Goldsmith said in an op/ed in the Cape Cod Times. The law has added $9.25 billion to the Massachusetts economy in the last decade, money that the state cannot afford to lose. “At a time when we are all struggling to get back on track after the economic collapse, the worst thing we could do is get rid of a vital economic tool used by cities, towns and nonprofit organizations every day,” they wrote
Candidates for governor oppose Question 2 (Worcester Telegram & Gazette, October 13)
Candidates see law as an important part of advancing workforce and affordable homes

All four gubernatorial candidates believe that the affordable housing law should not be repealed, reports the Worcester Telegram & Gazette. At a debate sponsored by the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce yesterday, each of the candidates urged defeat of the ballot initiative. The law is “probably the best way to ensure that we can continue to develop affordable housing for seniors,” said Republican Charles D. Baker.
Clergy join to fight housing law repeal (Boston Globe, October 13)
Leaders from across faiths hold press conference to oppose repeal

Christian, Jewish, and Muslim clergy gathered yesterday at Trinity Church in Copley Square to urge Massachusetts residents to vote no on Question 2, which would repeal the state’s affordable housing law, reports the Boston Globe. The religious leaders passionately argued against the repeal, saying it would make it harder to build homes for senior citizens, working families, and others in need of affordable housing. “Affordable housing, without fail, is what people in our communities tell me is the most critical issue,’’ said Bishop Thomas Shaw of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts. “As a person of faith, we’re supposed to care about people in need.’’
Affordable housing law could be repealed on Election Day (Newton Tab, October 12)
Teachers Work and Live in Same Community Thanks to Housing Law

The affordable housing law helped teachers Greg and Cate Gammons buy a home in Sudbury, reports the Newton Tab. The Gammonses bought their home, which was built using the affordable housing law, five years ago, bringing Greg Gammons into the same school district where he teaches. “I can’t tell you how appreciative we are to have the opportunity to live in the town in which I work and coach and with two young children. It’s just great to be close to home so I can see them more and really be involved in the community in which I work,” he said.
Kahn: Affordable housing: something we can all agree on (Newton Tab, October 12)
Affordable Housing Residents Integral Members of Communities

Creating more affordable housing for working families and seniors is something everyone can agree on, writes Kay Kahn in an op/ed in the Newton Tab. Those teachers, nurses, veterans and seniors who benefit from this law enrich communities, she says. “They are an integral part of our community’s character and economy.”
Candidates sound off on ballot questions (Lawrence Eagle Tribune, October 12)
Gubernatorial Candidates Voice Support for Affordable Housing Law

The affordable housing law “has provided much needed affordable housing to seniors, veterans and working families in Massachusetts,” gubernatorial candidate Charlie Baker told the Lawrence Eagle Tribune. All four candidates for governor told the paper that they will vote “no” on Question 2 to protect affordable housing in Massachusetts. Governor Deval Patrick said he has always supported affordable housing for working families, veterans, and seniors, and Treasurer Tim Cahill credited the law with the “creation of tens of thousands of affordable housing units for the middle class.”
Two sides to 40B fence: Affordable Housing Law Repeal on the ballot (Sun Chronicle, October 11)
Housing Law Helps Working Families Buy First Homes

In the 41 years since it was passed, the affordable housing law has fostered 1,000 housing developments throughout the state that created some 58,000 homes, reports the Sun Chronicle. Michelle Byrnes, who lives in an affordable home in Norton, told the Chronicle the law has helped her buy her home. “There's no way I would have been able to afford it," said Byrnes, a 36-year-old, self-employed single mother. “It was the best thing that ever happened to me."
On this one they all agree, vote “No” on Question 2 (Taunton Daily Gazette, October 11)
Housing Organizations Rely on Affordable Housing Law

Non-profits depend on the affordable housing law to help them carry out their missions of making Massachusetts a more affordable place to live, write Tripp Jones and Dean Harrison in an op/ed in the Taunton Daily Gazette. In Taunton, the Neighborhood Corporation has built 69 units of affordable housing since 2005, creating homes for working families and seniors. “The result has had a positive impact to the community and to the lives of the home owners and the residents of the units,” they write.
Jones, Gartrell: Keep housing program alive (MetroWest Daily News, October 11)
Affordable housing creates not just homes, but jobs and economic revenue

In a difficult economic climate, affordable housing helps to not only create homes for working families and seniors, but also creates jobs, writes Steve Gartrell and Trip Jones. The affordable housing law has created 50,000 jobs, which this state cannot afford to lose. “Repealing this law would cost the state at least that many jobs and economic benefits in the future,” Jones and Gartrell write.
Protect state's affordable-housing law (Newburyport News, October 11)
Affordable Housing Law Helps MA Residents Buy Homes

Newburyport Mayor Donna Holaday and members of the Newburyport Affordable Housing Trust said the attempt to repeal the affordable housing law is “reckless” in a letter to the Newburyport News. The authors write that the law has helped teachers, nurses, seniors, social workers and veterans buy homes. “We cannot let the benefits of this law be taken away from our seniors and working families who need it here in Newburyport and across the state,” they write.
YOUR VIEW: Vote 'no' on Question 2 (New Bedford Standard Times, October 8)
Affordable Housing Law Aids Non-Profits

Non-profit organizations, such as Community Action for Better Housing and the South Shore Housing Development Corporation, depend on the affordable housing law to carry out their missions of creating good homes for working families, writes Ed Allard and Tripp Jones in a letter to the New Bedford Standard Times. The groups help working families and seniors stay in the same communities they have been living in their entire lives, Jones and Allard write. “These groups are providing homes for teachers, nurses, social workers, retail employees, firefighters, police officers, administrative staff, retirees, the homeless and veterans.”
Vote no on Question 2 (Boston Business Journal, October 8)
Working Families, Economy, Depend on Affordable Housing Law

Many working families will be priced out of Massachusetts if the affordable housing law is repealed, devastating the state’s economy, Paul Guzzi and Tripp Jones write in an op/ed in the Boston Business Journal. Guzzi and Jones write that voting yes on Question 2 would destroy the primary statewide law that promotes the development of affordable housing, making it even harder for working families to stay here. “Our economic growth depends on them,” they write.

Download a PDF of the article

Letter: Vote No on Question 2 (Eagle Tribune, October 8)
Housing Partnership urges residents to vote no on Question 2
 
In a letter to the editor of the Eagle Tribune, George Koehler from North Andover’s Housing Partnership Committee urges everyone to vote “no” on Question 2 this November 2. Chapter 40B “is the best tool the state has to address an important and complicated problem — an inadequate supply of affordable housing,” he said.
LeBlanc, Alston-Follansbe: Keep Somerville housing affordable for working families (Somerville Journal, October 8)
The affordable housing law is essential to Somerville
 
Affordable housing for working families and seniors is essential to Somerville, said Danny Leblanc and Marc Alston-Follansbee in a letter to the editor of the Somerville Journal. After the Zoning Board of Appeals voted down a plan for additional affordable housing units, Leblanc and Alston-Follansbee express their concern over the decision. “We are calling upon city leaders to act to preserve Somerville’s diversity and ensure that Somerville remains affordable not just to the well-heeled, but to the low-income and working families who have historically called our city home.”
Study: Homes still not affordable for working families (MetroWest Daily News, October 8)
Eastern Massachusetts needs more affordable homes
 
A new Urban Land Institute study found that many homes in eastern Massachusetts remain too expensive for working families, reports the MetroWest Daily News. The Greater Boston area is short 25,000 affordable homes — and the problem may be getting worse, said the study. John McIlwain, a senior fellow at the Urban Land Institute, said he believes 40B has been beneficial in generating affordable housing.
Vote 'no' on Question 2 to protect affordable housing (Sentinel & Enterprise, October 7)
Gubernatorial Candidates Come Together on Question 2

The four gubernatorial candidates agree on one issue: that repealing the affordable housing law would mean the loss of affordable homes in Massachusetts, write Tripp Jones and Karen A. Koller in an op/ed in the Fitchburg Sentinel and Enterprise. Voting “no” on Question 2 will protect the affordable housing law and help build reasonably-priced homes for those who need them most: seniors and working families, Jones and Koller write. “A broad coalition of nearly 1,500 civic, municipal, business, labor, housing, environmental and religious leaders, including the League of Women Voters and AARP, urge you to vote "no" on Question 2 on Nov. 2,” they write.
Banking on the ballot questions (Worcester Magazine, October 6)
The Vote “NO” on 2 Campaign Gets Grassroots Support

Worcester Magazine reports that the Vote “NO” on 2 Campaign has raised a significant amount of money to try and keep the affordable housing law on the books. “We’re really proud of the fact that we’re able to get such wide support,” says Francy Ronyane, a spokeswoman for the campaign. She points out that 70 percent of their donations have been for $200 or less. The article also reports on the ties of the “YES” side to the Slow Growth Initiative, a nonprofit located in Chelmsford, affiliated with the New England Coalition for Sustainable Population, Inc. (NECSP), which supports population control.
To grow, the state needs 40B (Boston Globe, October 7)
Massachusetts Economy Needs the Affordable Housing Law

Massachusetts does not built enough homes to match our economic growth as is, Edward Glaeser writes in an op/ed for the Boston Globe, and losing the affordable housing law will make it much harder. Though the Massachusetts economy has been sustained through innovation and entrepreneurship, fewer people move here because the state does not have enough affordable housing, Glaeser says. "Repealing 40B will be yet another step that makes the state less dynamic, less affordable, and less economically exciting," he writes. "We need to attract more talented people and make it easier for companies trying to hire new workers. We need more economic freedom, and that means we still need Chapter 40B."
Now is not time to pull away safety net for housing (Boston Globe, October 7)
Seniors and Young Families Leaving State over Lack of Affordability

Losing the affordable housing law would present a "drastic" economic shift for Massachusetts, writes Diane K. Danielson in a letter to the Boston Globe. Danielson writes that the state is marked by the departure of seniors and young families who can no longer afford to live in Massachusetts. "How long will we continue to have a top-tier school system if our kids can’t afford to live here and raise their own families?," she writes
Letter: Vote no on Ballot Question 2 (Newton Tab, October 6)
Massachusetts Residents Need Affordable Housing Law

The affordable housing law requires no state subsidies and has a basic purpose: to create affordable housing for the people of Massachusetts, writes Bob Engler in a letter to the Newton Tab. Engler writes that the law’s beneficiaries are seniors are working families who cannot afford to rent or buy housing on the open market. “If you think housing is a basic right or you think it make sense to address the housing needs of the commonwealth’s citizens from a moral, political, economic or social perspective, you should vote No on Question 2,” Engler says.
Greater Somerville, October 5
Campaign Organizer Discusses Affordable Housing Law on Greater Somerville

James Madden, Eastern Massachusetts Organizer for the Vote “No” on Question 2 Campaign, dropped in on “Greater Somerville” last night to discuss the affordable housing law and the issues surrounding Question 2. Madden cleared up many misconceptions about the affordable housing law, including who the law benefits. “This law is really about allowing new housing to be built for seniors and working families,” he said.
Preserve affordable housing with 'No' on Question 2 (Lowell Sun, October 5)
Non-Profit Organizations Depend on Housing Law

In order for non-profits to carry out their missions of providing affordable housing to Massachusetts residents they rely heavily on the affordable housing law, writes Jim Wilde in a letter to the Lowell Sun. Wilde writes that the affordable housing law is responsible for 80 percent of the affordable housing created in Massachusetts, outside the major cities, over the past decade, and that much of that has been built by non-profit organizations. “Repealing the law would make housing less affordable for working families and seniors,” he says.
Kreutziger: Vote no on Question 2 (Lexington Minuteman, October 4, 2010)
Repealing Law Would Destroy Affordable Housing Efforts

If the affordable housing law is repealed, almost no new affordable housing will be built in most communities across the Commonwealth, writes Ken Kreutziger in a letter to the Lexington Minuteman. He writes that, with the help of the affordable housing law, Lexington has achieved the required 10 percent affordability. “For the future of our citizens and our state’s common wealth, we cannot afford to terminate this law,” he writes. “Please join me in voting no on Question 2.”
Why I will vote "NO" on Question 2: A hilltown perspective (Shelburne Falls & West County Independent, October 1)
Housing Prices Will Rise Without Affordable Housing Law

Affordable housing will rapidly become unavailable if the affordable housing law is repealed, Andrew Baker writes in a letter to the Shelburne Falls and West County Independent. The affordable housing law is instrumental in creating homes that working professionals like nurses, war veterans, firefighters and teachers can afford, writes Baker. “Bottom line: if the ‘yes’ vote wins and the law is repealed, a lot less affordable housing will be built in a lot fewer places,” he says.

Download a PDF of the Op/Ed

Retain 40B (Worcester Telegram & Gazette, October 3)
Worcester Telegram and Gazette Urges Readers to Vote “NO” on 2

The affordable housing law has been instrumental in creating affordable housing in Massachusetts and should not be repealed, editorialized the Worcester Telegram & Gazette. The editorial says that the law has built affordable housing where there otherwise would be none, and helps to create lasting communities. “And the housing units being created are often made available to seniors and young families with deep roots in Massachusetts — folks with every reason to continue to live, work and contribute to the state’s economy, provided they can afford to remain here,” it says.
Vote no on Question 2 to save affordable housing (Cape Cod Times, October 4)
Cape Cod Has Received Many Benefits from the Affordable Housing Law

In a letter to the Cape Cod Times, Thomas Peterson, treasurer of the Harwich Ecumenical Council for the Homeless, urges all voters to vote “no” on Question 2, and writes that the affordable housing law has had “extraordinary societal benefits” for Cape Cod. “Young adults are able to stay in the community where they grew up, if they choose,” he writes. “Seniors can stay in towns where they raised their children.”
Deutsch: Please vote no on Ballot Question 2 (Sudbury Town Crier, October 1)
Affordable Housing Law Helps Those Who Need Good Homes

Repealing would stop the creation of affordable housing in most communities across the state, resulting in the loss of needed jobs as well as of needed housing, wrote Unitarian Universalist Minister Judy Deutsch in a letter to the editor in the Sudbury Town Crier. Deutsch says that the law helps keeps families in the same town. “Maybe it's the minister in me that thinks that in a town with so many houses of worship, we inhabitants should welcome as neighbors others who are not so fortunate,” she wrote.
Question 2 on the November Ballot (the Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy, September 30)
Repeal would force rental prices to skyrocket

The affordable housing law’s repeal would limit the supply of most new rental housing outside cities, as well as affordable homeownership units, hurting the elderly and working families including those headed by teachers, police and fire fighters, according to an article from the Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy at Northeastern University. The article comes to the conclusion that the affordable housing law has been “essential for the production of multifamily housing, both market rate and affordable. There have been few developer abuses and no measurable adverse impact on host communities.”

Download a PDF of the article

Outer Cape Debates (WOMR, September 21)
Keeping Graduates in Mass Essential to State’s Economy

Massachusetts remains an expensive place to live, and the affordable housing law is crucial to making it more affordable, campaign spokesperson Francy Ronayne said on Outer Cape Debate on WOMR. While Massachusetts is home to some of the nation’s best academic institutions, many students leave after graduation because they find the Commonwealth unaffordable, said Ronayne. “If we don’t provide the students who are graduating from our colleges and universities homes…we’ll suffer from a brain drain,” she said.
Coalition urges voters to protect affordable housing and vote no on Question Two (Daily Holden, September 29)
Affordable Housing Law Keeps Working Families in the Commonwealth

The affordable housing law is “vital” for helping young families and seniors remain in the same communities they have worked and lived in, reports the Daily Holden. The paper reports that the law helps people afford to live in Massachusetts and live close to where they work. "A lot of my friends love Massachusetts, we were born here and we grew up here, and we really want to start raising our family here, but it's very expensive before you really get some earning power,” said campaign spokesperson Francy Ronayne. “So this law helps those people stay here, and contribute positively to the economy."
Amundson: Vote no on Question 2, preserve affordable housing (Milford Daily News, September 28)
Affordable Housing Law Increases Tax Base

The affordable housing law helps local communities get infrastructure improvements from developers and increases the tax base, writes Megan Amundson, campaign manager for the Vote “No” on Question 2 Campaign. In a letter to the Milford Daily News, Amundson writes that the law has created $9.25 billion, and is supported by all three candidates for governor. “Repealing this law will make housing less affordable in Massachusetts.”
40B in voters’ backyard (Boston Globe, September 27)
Commonwealth Needs Affordable Housing Law

Voting no on Question 2 to keep the affordable housing law is an “easy call,” writes Tom Keane in the Boston Globe. Keane writes that improvements to the law in the last decade have eradicated the possibility for abuse, and it has accomplished its goal of creating reasonably-priced homes for Massachusetts residents. “Get rid of 40B?," he writes. "No way. Indeed, we need more laws like it."
Anti-40B Activists Have Long Row To Hoe (Banker & Tradesman, September 26)
Coalition to Repeal Affordable Housing Law Lacks Support

Question 2 is headed to a “lopsided defeat,” writes Scott Van Voorhis in the Banker & Tradesman. Van Voorhis writes that the Coalition to Repeal 40B is “withering” without the support of a major political candidate, and says that its main arguments are “ludicrous.” “In fact, much of the little new housing we have seen built, both market rate and affordable, has been due to 40B,” writes Van Voorhis. “Nor is it welfare housing, with the subsidized rentals or condos offered at prices that, while hardly cheap, are affordable to firefighters, teachers and town workers.”

Download a PDF of the column

Chapter 40B, sales tax should both be left intact (Cape Cod Times, September 26)
Affordable Housing Law Essential for Creating Housing on Cape Cod

The affordable housing law is an essential tool for creating housing for a wide range of people on Cape Cod, including veterans, workers, small-business owners, families and local municipal workers, writes Jennifer Smith and Terence Noonan in a letter to the editor in the Cape Cod Times. The letter, a response to an op/ed in the paper last week, says that the people who live in housing created by the affordable housing law are a “true representation the Cape and its people” and that the law should not be repealed.
Catholic bishops oppose repeal of state affordable housing law (Boston Globe, September 22)
Catholic Bishops Affirm Support for Affordable Housing Law

Adding an influential voice to the campaign to protect the Massachusetts affordable housing law, the state’s Catholic bishops declared their opposition yesterday to ballot Question 2, reports the Boston Globe. The Boston Archdiocese was one of the original backers of the law when it was passed in 1969. “Housing is a human right,’’ according to a statement from the bishops. “[Preserving the law would] preserve our state’s ability to act in the most effective way to meet the need of every individual for a decent affordable home.”
City will ask Holy Cross to join the ranks of PILOT participants (Worcester Telegram & Gazette, September 22)
City Council Passes Resolution in Support of Affordable Housing Law

The Worcester City Council has unanimously passed a resolution declaring its opposition to Question 2, reports the Worcester Telegram and Gazette. The resolution introduced by Worcester Mayor Joseph C. O'Brien. The resolution also has the support of the city administration, which recently released a report recommending the council pass the resolution. “Without Chapter 40B, there would be no regulatory incentive to promote a balance of affordable housing in all communities across the Commonwealth,” said Assistant City Manager Julie A. Jacobson
Arlington League of Women Voters will be at Town Day (Arlington Advocate, September 22, 2010)
Non-partisan Voter Organization Supports “No” on 2 Campaign

The Arlington League of Women Voters is a strong supporter of the Vote “No” on Question 2 Campaign, reports the Arlington Advocate. The league never endorses candidates and is non-partisan in its voter service, but it does study issues and supports or opposes legislation. “A ‘no’ vote will show our support for affordable housing for seniors and families who need it across the commonwealth and not only in the largest cities, which already have the most units,” reports the Advocate
Editorial: Retain Mass. housing law (Providence Journal, September 19)
Law Keeps Families in the Communities Where They Work

The affordable housing law has proved a “vital” tool for promoting mixed-income communities in the Commonwealth, according to an editorial from the Providence Journal. The publication urges Massachusetts residents to vote “no” on Question 2, writing that the law has helped the state enormously and is essential to eliminating sprawl. “Something is wrong when the people who serve wealthy communities, from teachers to plumbers, must travel in from out of state,” the paper writes.
40B zoning law is not about snobbery, but smart growth (Boston Globe, September 19)
Communities Achieve Smart Growth Through Affordable Housing Law

The affordable housing law is crucial to helping communities achieve “smart growth,” editorializes the Boston Globe. The Globe writes that the law helps cities and towns build housing where they need it, fostering development in walkable communities, served by public transportation, and surrounded by open lands. Of the repeal, The Globe writes, “There’s no reason to kill it now, and every reason to keep it for the future.”
Affordable-housing law called a big boon (Boston Globe, September 15)
Study shows affordable housing law crucial to the state's economic health

The Boston Globe reports that the state’s affordable-housing law has generated more than $9.25 billion in construction and related spending over the past 10 years, according to a study released today by the University of Massachusetts Donahue Institute. The report also found that more than 21,000 housing units that are part of planned affordable housing law developments would result in more than 54,300 jobs and another $10.42 billion in spending. “It demonstrates the significant economic impact that affordable housing has had in the Commonwealth,’’ said Aaron Gornstein, executive director of CHAPA. “It is one of the important reasons to make sure it does not get repealed."
Neighbor to Neighbor (The Item, September 10)
RCAP Solutions celebrates four decades of bringing affordable housing to central Mass

RCAP solutions, which has been a nonprofit sponsor of almost a thousand affordable housing developments, recently commemorated its 40th anniversary in Bolton, reports The Item. The company has offered property development and management services to companies in central Massachusetts since 1969. Its anniversary party was at Bolton Country Manor, which provides 28 federally subsidized apartments to seniors and people with mobility impairments. At the celebration, RCAP Solutions President and CEO Karen A. Koller said, “These programs are designed to allow seniors to live in or near their hometowns and families; providing a key factor in the quality of life.”
Sales tax rollback wins support of 54 percent in poll (Brockton Enterprise, September 8)
Voters reject Question 2 in new poll
 
If held today, the Massachusetts electorate would defeat Question 2, according to the latest State House News Service Poll. The Brockton Enterprise reports that respondents to the poll rejected the question with a 36-54 percent margin, with 10 percent undecided. Question 2 seeks to repeal the affordable housing law, which is the primary tool for creating affordable housing in the Commonwealth.

Mayor wants council to oppose Question 2 (Worcester Telegram & Gazette, September 7)
Mayor urges council to support affordable housing law

Worcester Mayor Joseph O’Brien will ask the city council to go on record in opposition to Question 2, reports the Worcester Telegram & Gazette. The paper reports that the mayor will present the city council with a resolution at Sep. 7’s meeting in support of the affordable housing law. Worcester has been no stranger to affordable housing; the paper reports that 14 percent of its housing inventory is classified as “affordable,” according to city officials.

Download a PDF of this article

On ballot questions: No, no and no (Boston Examiner, August 26)
Online conservative columnist backs the affordable housing law

The Conservative Columnist for Boston’s Examiner, Walter Bird Jr. urges voters to vote “no, no, and no” on the November ballot questions. Bird says that the affordable housing law helps cut down on red tape by letting municipal Zoning Boards of Appeals hold public hearings on proposed developments. Without the law, developers would have to file separate permits with different local agencies and officials. “Given there are so many communities in need of affordable housing, especially for seniors, there need not be any more roadblocks put in place,” Bird writes
Two Arlington organizations have affordable housing projects in the works (Arlington Advocate, August 20)
Affordable housing law brings new developments to Arlington

Two new affordable housing developments are in the works in Arlington, reports the Arlington Advocate. The developments include homes on Medford Street and an apartment complex on Massachusetts Avenue. David Levy, director of the Housing Corporation of Arlington, said the units will create homes for a range of people, including families. Levy said the affordable housing law is essential to creating developments like this. “It’s a critical law in Massachusetts if we’re going to continue to create affordable housing,” he said.
Tom & Todd's Face Off (WRKO, August 18)
Radio host Tom Finneran supports the affordable housing law

On Tom & Todd’s Face Off, WRKO’s Tom Finneran urged voters to vote “no” on Question 2, calling the attempt to repeal the affordable housing law “extreme.” Finneran debated the ballot questions with State Representative Bradley Jones, filling in for Todd Feinburg. Jones also said he does not support repealing the affordable housing law. Finneran said the law is crucial to keeping young working professionals in Massachusetts. “So many of our young people become discouraged by the cost of housing, they move away,” Finneran said. “That's our economic future, that's our life blood.”
Keep Affordable Housing Law Intact (Concord Patch, August 17)
Attempt to repeal affordable housing law is dangerous, reckless.

Campaign Spokesperson Francy Ronayne spoke to the Concord Patch about the Vote “No” on Question 2 Campaign and the affordable housing law. Ronayne notes that more than 400 individuals and organizations have joined the Coalition to Protect the Affordable Housing Law, and that the effort is completely non-partisan. All three major candidates for governor have urged voters to vote “no” on Question 2 to protect affordable housing in Massachusettes. “It doesn't matter what party you belong to, no one wants to hurt seniors and working families,” she said.
Mass voters should let Chapter 40B stay (Providence Business News, August 16)
Repealing the affordable housing law would be devastating to construction industry

The affordable housing law makes it possible for working class families to live in a state with some of the nation’s most expensive real estate, editorializes the Providence Business News. The publication urged Massachusetts voters to vote “no” on Question 2 this November. The law has been essential to reviving the construction industry, creating jobs that will lost if it is repealed, writes the paper. “In today’s economy, it would be insanity to further hobble the home construction industry,” it writes.

Click here to download a PDF of the editorial

Friends And Enemies Of 40B Ready For Fight (Worcester Business Journal, August 16)
Vote “No” on Question 2 Campaign gears up for Fall election

The Vote “No” on Question 2 Campaign is gathering steam in anticipation of the November election, writes the Worcester Business Journal. The article outlines the issues at stake in the election. The article notes the long list of supporters behind the affordable housing law, including all three major candidates for governor. “Businesses of all sizes need the affordable housing law so employees can afford to live here,” said campaign spokesperson Francy Ronayne.
Editorial Painted 40B All Wrong (Worcester Business Journal, August 16)
Massachusetts businesses need the affordable housing law

Tripp Jones, chairman of the Vote “no” on Question 2 Campaign, writes in the Worcester Business Journal that the affordable housing law is essential to keeping our state economy on track. Jones notes that 80 percent of the affordable housing outside the major cities in the last decade has been built with the help of the affordable housing law. “ While we support and have supported efforts to improve on this already effective law, that is not what this ballot question seeks to do,” writes Jones. “It would simply throw out the law without anything to replace it.”
Home-buying in Falmouth no easy task (Falmouth Bulletin, August 12)
More affordable housing needed in Falmouth

For some, buying a home in Falmouth is a far-reaching goal, reports the Falmouth Bulletin. While the median selling point for homes in the area increases, median income isn’t catching up. Residents central to the community are affected, said Edward Schmuhl, chairman of the Affordable Housing Committee. “We’re talking about teachers, town employees and others with whom we interact every day,” he said.
Rentals harder to find, afford (Boston Globe, August 10)
Fewer apartment vacancies cause rents to rise in Bay State

Apartment vacancies are down and rents are up in Massachusetts for the first time since the beginning of the recession, reports the Boston Globe. An increase in foreclosures has forced more residents into the rental market, making apartments harder to find - and afford - when many families are struggling with lost jobs, lost homes, and pay cuts. Reginald Fuller is one Massachusetts resident who will be forced out of his apartment with his family. Fuller has recieved eviction notices after he couldn't pay the $150 increase in his rent.  “It makes me kind of feel like I let my family down,’’ said Fuller, 53. “I’m about to join the ranks of the homeless, and that’s a place I’ve never been.’’
Addressing a housing shortage (Framingham Tab, August 6)
New affordable housing project provides home for seniors

The Jewish Community Housing for the Elderly will complete a $42 million independent senior living community in Framingham next year. The 151,000-square-foot project, developed using the affordable housing law, will feature a mix of 150 market-rate and affordable apartments. The project has elicited praise from members of the community who say there is not enough affordable housing for the elderly in Framingham. "Certainly we hear all the time that there is a need for senior housing,'' said Tom Farmer, spokesman for MassHousing.